Continuing Traditions

GVHA manages properties in the heart of Lekwungen territory – the Victoria Cruise Ship Terminal, Steamship Terminal, Fisherman’s Wharf, the Causeway, Ship Point, and the Wharf Street and Johnson Street marinas. Songhees and Esquimalt Nations continue to demonstrate their historical ties to these lands through a number of initiatives.

First Nation’s Causeway Artists’ Program

The GVHA reserves the entire south side of the Lower Causeway in the Inner Harbour for the production and sale of traditional carvings and artwork by First Nations carvers and artisans. Coordination of this part of the Inner Harbour market is overseen by a Songhees Nation bylaw officer. All agreements regarding rates and expectations are overseen by the Songhees Nation.

Juggler’s Pitch

Juggler’s Pitch is a central area in the inner harbour where street performers entertain visitors and locals alike. In 2014, GVHA funded the development of an interpretative screen that highlights the history of the Lekwungen people – known today as the Songhees and Esquimalt Nations.

Signs of Lekwungen

Established in 2008, the Signs of Lekwungen is an interpretive walkway along the Inner Harbour and surrounding areas that honours the art, history, and culture of the Coast Salish people who have resided in the Victoria area for hundreds of years. Coast Salish artist Butch Dick designed the spindle whorls, which were originally used by Coast Salish women to spin wool. They are considered the foundation of a Coast Salish family. Seven site markers are located throughout Victoria’s harbour area and the one shown above is located on Victoria’s Harbour.